Keep your hand off your sword

Dated: August 16 2020

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The practice of shaking hands probably began as a ritual to demonstrate that neither person involved is carrying a weapon. It has even been suggested that the up-and-down motion of a handshake was intended to dislodge any daggers that might be hidden up a sleeve. 

Picture this: two strangers meet to complete an eBay deal—a petite woman and a big burly man carrying a baseball bat. She asks him to put down the bat before they do business, and he replies, “I prefer to keep my options open.” Do you think she will get out the jewelry she’s selling, or turn and walk away?

This is why it’s usually a bad idea not to initial the arbitration and liquidated damages clauses in a purchase contract. These clauses limit how bad things can get if the escrow becomes a battle. Failing to initial them is kind of like resting your hand on the hilt of your sword when you should be extending it to shake the hand of your new transaction partner.

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DAVID DUNLAP

As a residential real estate executive with an extensive background in corporate marketing, I am able to apply unusually strong skills in marketing communications, e-marketing, strategic planning and ....

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